Tag Archives: Mental Fitness Challenge

DO THIS! – Important Tools for Your Success Journey

A few weeks ago I pointed out some things I’ve learned to avoid along the road to success. Through mentoring with my good friend, Orrin Woodward, I’ve learned to define and believe in my dreams, get rid of negative expectations and negative beliefs, pursue character and get out of my comfort zone. Of course, those aren’t the only keys to navigating the journey of success, so here are a few more tools for the road.

Get Rid of a Wrong View of Success

What good is trying to move on along the road to success if you don’t even know what success really is? Most people assume success can be measured by something you accomplish or own, but they would be wrong. Success, real success, doesn’t come from the outside, it comes from the inside.

This is where it’s important to apply the Define, Learn, Do principle. That starts with thinking about what you truly want when it comes to success, and asking yourself what it will give you that you wouldn’t otherwise have. Keep asking that question so you can keep finding answers that move you along the road.

The truth of the matter is that we all ultimately want to feel good about ourselves, and we don’t have to get stuff or accomplish things to do so. True success always comes from the inside.

Don’t settle for Mediocrity

If real success comes from the inside, then you can change whenever you want through working on your personal mental fitness. Success isn’t what you thought it was, so don’t settle for “good enough.” Working on inward success doesn’t have to be a drag, it can be fun and enjoyable.

Build Trust (in yourself and the process toward success)

It’s essential that you trust the process.  Once you’ve started along the road to real success, you don’t have to know exactly how it’s all going to work out. In fact, it’s impossible to know all the ins and outs of the success journey.

Have Passion

What you do need to know is what you are passionate about. Follow your highest excitement, seek some counsel and have some trust in yourself, because ultimately you are the only one who can discover the passions that will spur you along the road to success.

The most successful people are those who are passionate about what they do. Now, there are people out there that don’t love what they do and are successful financially but dying on the inside. That’s because money doesn’t make you happy.

Being successful is not about making a lot of money, it’s about doing what you love, what you are passionate about, and doing what God has called you to do. The funny thing is that when you do something you love and get really good at it, the money tends to follow.

As you consider the road to real success, trusting yourself and following your passions may seem a overwhelming, even scary. That’s the time to take action – it’s the best way to conquer fear and build confidence. As soon as you do, you’ll begin accumulating experience and knowledge and soon find yourself moving on along your success journey.

How have you learned to define real success? Has discovering your passions been an important tool on your personal success journey?

God Bless, Tim Marks

Capping Off The Symphony of Success

Recently, I was thinking through the final resolution in Orrin Woodward’s book, Resolved. If you’re one of the many people who are taking the Mental Fitness Challenge, then you’ve probably spent the last several weeks reading through Resolved and maybe have even finished it – but just in case you haven’t here is what the final resolution says:

Resolved: To reverse the current decline in my field of mastery because I know that a true legacy leaves the world a better place than when I found it.

Orrin Woodward calls Legacy “capping off the symphony of success.” I think most of us would desire to live up to that resolution, but maybe don’t really know how to do it, or where to start.

You see, Legacy is not really about all the things we do, whether we build a successful business or work hard as an engineer or manager or anything else. That’s not necessarily a legacy, though it may be part of it. People will remember more about who we are and what we gave, what we left behind that benefits society; than about what work we did and what things we owned. Legacy is all about what you leave behind for others.

Legacy and LibertyRoman Ruins in the UK picture

Legacy should be the protector of liberty. In Resolved, Orrin writes about the three types of liberty we long for and still have in this country, at least to some degree:

1. Spiritual Liberty
2. Political Liberty
3. Economic Liberty

In the absence of these liberties, our country will continue in decline until – like the ancient Roman Empire – it collapses on itself. Legacy is a defense against that end.

So what can we do?

One place to start is in training up the next generation to be defenders of these three crucial liberties. Teach the kids in your life to thoughtfully invest themselves in God’s work, both locally and internationally. Encourage them to uphold the rule of law and work towards reform in areas where government is weak. Teach kids about money now so they don’t go broke later. Introduce them to English preacher John Wesley’s famous teaching on money, “Make all you can, save all you can, give all you can.”

And of course, these aren’t just good lessons for kids. We all should be willing to evaluate our lives and ask the question, “What will I do to create and preserve my legacy and the legacy of my generation?”

The west has a great need for some folks that not only want to leave a legacy but that will WORK to leave a legacy.

I hope you join us.

What are you doing to leave a legacy?

God Bless, Tim Marks