Seven Reasons the Roman Empire Fell, and What the US Can Learn

Here is a blog I came across that, as it’s title describes, shares seven reason the Roman Empire fell.  I have added my own thoughts and comments to each point.  The best way to change things is to educate ourselves and those around us!

God bless, Tim Marks

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Seven Reasons Why the Roman Empire Fell: What the USA can Learn.

“America is like a healthy body and its resistance is threefold: its patriotism, its morality and its spiritual life. If we can undermine these three areas, America will collapse from within.” -Joseph Stalin

There are seven reasons (among others) why the Roman Empire fell. The most important of the seven have to do with the break down of religion, morality and the family. Everything else rippled from these three factors.

1. Family disintegration: Bachelors became more highly esteemed than husbands and fathers in society. In the second and third century of the Christian era, it had become a stigma for men to be “tied down” to families. Sexual liberation, especially among men, was lauded.

Tims’ thoughts: “Not only is the traditional family mocked but actually redefined by many in un-natural ways. See Romans 1:26.”

2. Low birth rate: During the centuries that followed Christ’s ascension into heaven, the Roman Empire had already experienced a precipitous drop in the birth rate. This trend started when Augustus, the Roman emperor, reigned. Even he tried to promulgate incentives for families to have more children; but it was too late. Before Augustus, it wasn’t unusual for couples to have up to twelve children. In the decades that followed, couples, much like today, only had one or two children at the most. Over the centuries, the city of Rome went from a million inhabitants to less than fifty thousand. Depopulation had a devastating affect on both the Roman empire and ancient Greece.

Tim’s thoughts:  “According to Live Science The U.S. birth rate reached an all-time low in 2013, as the number of babies born in the country declined for the sixth straight year since the peak in 2007, a new report finds. The country’s birth rate dipped to 62.5 births per 1,000 women between ages 15 and 44, according to the report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). That is 10 percent lower than the birth rate in 2007, which was 69.3 per 1,000 women, and a record low since the government started tracking birth rates in 1909, when birth rate was 126.8.”

3. Fragmentation of religion: There were so many gods for so many special causes and towns- especially because the Roman religion imported gods from the Hellenistic culture (Greek culture spread throughout the Roman Empire) -that the ancient pagans despaired of having any uniformity. And over the years, they increasingly found it difficult to find meaning in the rituals or even to believe the veracity of their own creeds.

Tim’s thoughts: “I can only say that Christianity was fairly new in Rome when it fell, but Rome didn’t fall because of it. Additionaly Rome did not grow “because of” its pagan religions but “in spite of”. We know this because the greatest nations on earth have had Christian values and laws based on these values.”

4. Language, literature and art had fallen into disrepair. Like modern art today, Roman art was of poor quality because it was an escape from reality. Latin was badly used and literature became vulgar.

Tim’s Thoughts: “So much of what we see pass as “art” today is hardly beautiful or took the touch of a masters hand to create it. The most vulgar piece I have ever read about is this:”
Piss Christ is a 1987 photograph by the American artist and photographer Andres Serrano. It depicts a small plastic crucifix submerged in a glass of the artist’s urine. The piece was a winner of the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art‘s “Awards in the Visual Arts” competition,[1] which was sponsored in part by the National Endowment for the Arts, a United States Government agency that offers support and funding for artistic projects, without controlling content.

5. Centralization and expansion of government: Take for instance the third century A.D.(200’s) Ralph Martin Novak, author of “Christianity and the Roman Empire”, provides a sobering statistic of 3rd century Rome which serves as a warning to our U.S. government.

He said, “It is estimated that whereas at the start of the third century A.D. the Roman emperors employed only about 300 to 350 full-time individuals in administering the Empire, by 300 A.D. this number had grown to some 30,000 or 35,000 people. The expense of this vastly increased administrative and military structure was an enormous burden on the people of the Empire, and the burden only grew more oppressive over the course of the fourth century A.D….Rome’s efforts to collect the taxes necessary to pay for defense and administration exacerbated the already deep social and economic divisions within the Roman empire.”

Because the Roman government so starved agricultural incentives, miles and miles of farmland was left uncultivated and therefore unused.

Tim’s Thoughts: The government is everywhere! Dta from 2008. Its worse now but I can’t find consistent numbers

  • Number of Full-Time Federal Employees – 2,518,101
  • Part-Time – 250,785
  • Full-Time State – 3,818,577, Part-Time – 1,451,002
  • Full-Time Local – 11,039,250, Part-Time – 3,383,976
  • TOTAL – 22,461,691
  • 2008 US Population (est) – 304,059,724
  • % of Gov’t employees – 7.38%
  • Inverse – 13.536
So this means that there’s a government employee for every 13.5 people in the country.”

6. Citizenship became cheap and immigration easy. Barbarians from outside of the Roman Empire had easy access to Roman institutions and they further began to infiltrate the Roman army. Hence, the loyalties among Roman soldiers became divided. Military campaigns had faltered as a result. What is more, Roman culture became vulnerable to fragmentation.

Tim’s Thoughts: “I am all for immigration! Come on in –  LEGALLY!!!!   See borders.”

 

7. The culture of death was alive and well. Consider the following practices which had political, legal and social sanction:

a. Baby exposure: This practice of infanticide, back then called “baby exposure”, couples would simply throw unwanted babies away. They would either kill them outright or take them out to the garbage. This was widely practiced. Seneca, a Roman philosopher, said this about killing babies: “We drown even children who at birth are weakly and abnormal. Yet it is not anger, but reason that separates the harmful from the sound.”

Tim’s Thoughts: “Romans would toss unwanted babies in the trash and most of us would think that is barbaric. I can only ask, ‘why is it  less barbaric just because we do it in a doctors office?’    There are approximately 1.21 million abortions in America each year.”

b. Gladiator games: Gladiators, slaves and prisoners would be killed in these blood sports for the purpose of entertaining the unemployed mob. Seneca, the same Roman philosopher who approved of infanticide and who was later forced to commit suicide by the Emperor Nero, said this about a gladiator game he saw:

“I come home more greedy, more cruel and inhuman, because I have been among human beings. By chance I attended a midday exhibition, expecting some fun, wit, and relaxation…But it was quite the contrary…These noon fighters are sent out with no armor of any kind; they are exposed to blows at all points, and no one ever strikes in vain…In the morning they throw men to the lions; at noon they throw them to the spectators.”

c. Slavery was prominent and the social subordination of women and children to that of men was protected by law. Not much more needs to be said about that.

These seven factors made the Roman Empire vulnerable to outside foreign forces starting in 410 A.D. St. Augustine witnessed the beginning of its collapse. And for several hundred years the Catholic Church had to pick up the pieces from what was left of pagan Rome and build a new Christian civilization. But it took blood, sweat and tears to do it.

Dr. Phil Jenkins, author of “The Lost History of Christianity: The Thousand-Year Golden Age of the Church in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia- and How it Died,” once wrote the following: “Dechristianization is one of the least studied aspects of Christian history. Partly, the lack of interest in vanishing churches is a matter of practicality, in that dying organizations tend not to produce records of their own extinction.” The fact is…if the Church goes down, the nation goes with it. This has been a recurring reality throughout world history.

Perhaps this is why out of 45 goals Communists set out to achieve in 1958, #27 and #28 took direct aim at Christianity. According to Cleon Skousen’s book, “The Naked Communist,” these two goals read as follows:

#27. Infiltrate the churches and replace revealed religion with “social” religion. Discredit the Bible and emphasize the need for intellectual maturity, which does not need a “religious crutch.”

#28. Eliminate prayer or any phase of religious expression in the schools on the ground that it violates the principle of “separation of church and state.”

And finally, let us not forget the infamous words of Joseph Stalin, dictator of the Soviet Union:
“America is like a healthy body and its resistance is threefold: its patriotism, its morality and its spiritual life. If we can undermine these three areas, America will collapse from within.”

Unfortunately, the Communists, including Stalin, knew their history well. They knew why Rome fell. If America falls, it will be for the same reasons every other nation, civilization or empire fell; and that reason has everything to do with religion, morality and the family.

6 thoughts on “Seven Reasons the Roman Empire Fell, and What the US Can Learn”

  1. THATS THE TRUTH…..ONLY THE ORGANIZED WHO

    HAVE A PLAN TO STOP IT….PEOPLE ARE TRAINED

    TO LOOK ON..SPECTATORS…NOT GET INVOLVED

    IN KEEPING THINGS FREE.. EG… YOU MIND

    BLESSINGS….PAUL IN OTTAWA. IN FLORIDA FOR WINTER

  2. This want excellent article Tim. It is a reminder that our job as leaders is to remind the populace that history tends to repeat itself unless just men remain vigilant and act.

  3. Great article Tim! The stark similarities between the U.S. and Ancient Rome are scary, and very evident everywhere. We have a lot of work to do through Life Leadership.

  4. “Those who don’t learn from history are bound to repeat it.” Oh, for more people who are hungry students of the past. History allows us to look at the thinking of people, the influencers in that thinking, the decisions made and the subsequent results over time.

    The current state of affairs in this country is alarming but I am confident that the tide can turn. As Benjamin Disraeli laid out in the Cycle of the Body Politic, it was information that made a change in the spiritual thinking of our Founding Fathers that ended in FREEDOM, the same is true today. As we introduce Truth (in the 8 F’s) to people, one at a time, influincing the influencers, we too can bring about change for the better.

  5. Great information that is out there for everyone to see, but not everyone does. It is directly relevant to what’s happening now.
    Grateful fo the leaders of LIFE to keep getting this info out and it is up to us to keep sharing it as they release it and add relevant info that we may contribute to the dialogue.
    Thanks for being in the forefront w/Orrin, Chris Brady & the rest of the leaders setting the pace & encouraging everyone at the same time.

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